Albany Pine Bush News

2006KBreisch oriental bittersweet

Celastrus orbiculatus, also known as “bittersweet,” girdles and kills native trees. Its stems and berries have been used in fall decorations which has spread this invasive species to new locations.

Whether or not you’re aware of it, you’ve almost certainly been in contact with an invasive species. You may have pulled them from your garden, brushed their pollen from your clothes, seen signs of them in the yellowing leaves of forest trees, or heard them calling from window ledges in your neighborhood. Without training to recognize these species, however, most of us don’t experience them as anything out of the ordinary. Shrub Honeysuckle, for instance, appears as just another bush with bright berries, Purple Loosestrife adds color to the roadside at a certain time of year, and House Sparrows simply contribute to the chatter above our heads in spring. While they may appear innocuous, or even beautiful, invasive species like these are leading to the loss of native plant and animal species throughout the State, degrading our ecosystems and our health along with them.

So, what exactly is an invasive species? Invasive species are plants, animals, bacteria, fungi, and, yes, even viruses that have arrived someplace new, only to wreak havoc on what was there before. By most definitions, including the one used by the New York State legislature, in order for a species to be invasive, it must be non-native and pose a significant threat to the economy, the environment, or human health. Thus, invasive species are, by definition, causing big problems ­– even as we fail to notice them in our day-to-day lives. It is for this reason that State legislators have followed the lead of the federal government, and created an annual NY Invasive Species Awareness Week (this week!) to help all of us become a little better at spotting the things that don’t belong and taking action to make things a little better.

What do invasive species have to do with the Albany Pine Bush Preserve? The short answer: a lot. Invasive species are particularly prevalent in places where there are many people bringing in goods from far-off places. Transportation has played a large role in Albany’s economy for hundreds of years, with people and goods from around the world passing through the city. Non-native species are one legacy of this past. Today, more than 28 species listed by NYS as highly invasive have been recorded in the Albany Pine Bush Preserve. We know this number precisely because Preserve staff are dedicated to monitoring the ecosystem, identifying invasive species, and taking action to reduce or remove them. As the organization in charge of protecting one of the largest, publicly accessible, natural areas within Albany County (also a National Natural Landmark), the Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission has a great responsibility to ensure that native plants and animals will continue to persist here. This means keeping invasive species in check.

This picture shows Black Locust trees that were removed from a site near Washington Ave. Extension, Albany

This picture shows Black Locust trees that the Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission removed from a site near Washington Ave. Extension, Albany

One of the highly invasive plant species that preserve managers at the Albany Pine Bush have been successful in removing from many locations is Black Locust. This tree was introduced to the Northeast from the southeastern United States because of its value for fence posts, erosion control and firewood. Unfortunately, when this species becomes established in pine barrens, it can decimate the ecosystem. It is a fast-growing and tenacious species, that outcompetes native pine barrens plants, reduces the amount of light reaching the ground, and prevents ecologically necessary wildland fire.  It is able to send up new sprouts from from stumps and roots, and dramatically alters soil chemistry to the detriment of native plants. Recently, managers at the Albany Pine Bush cleared Black Locust from large sections of Preserve land along Washington Avenue Extension, a process that involved removing the trees and digging up the interconnected root system of the expansive locust grove (also called a clone).

A critical part of the restoration process at the Albany Pine Bush is making sure that once invasive species are removed, another invasive species will not simply take its place. To prevent this, Preserve managers quickly plant native species where invasive species have been eliminated. Once the vegetation in a site is restored to native plants, hand pulling, targeted herbicide, mowing, and periodic prescribed or controlled fires are used to keep invasive species from returning. The Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission also works with municipalities, agencies, and our neighbors to reduce the risks of invasive plants by providing information about invasive species and about native species alternatives that can be used in landscaping. Conservation of the Albany Pine Bush will require that we all do what can to protect this globally rare, nationally significant, and locally distinct natural area.

To find out more about invasive species and events happening in throughout NY in recognition of Invasive Species Awareness Week, please follow the links below:

http://www.nyis.info/blog/

http://www.dec.ny.gov/education/1980.html

Grace Barber @ 5:51 pm

Kbb on displayALBANY, NY – The Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission invites the public to the Discovery Center for a rare opportunity to view Karner blue butterflies raised for release as part of its effort to recover this endangered species. The butterflies can be seen at the Discovery Center, located at 195 New Karner Road in Albany, through July 20 and perhaps longer depending on the rate at which they emerge from their chrysalises.

According to Executive Director Christopher Hawver, “This is a shining example of the outstanding work being done by our conservation science team on this globally-rare Preserve. It also showcases how the Discovery Center serves as a public resource connecting people directly to nature and science.”

After more than 50 years of decline, the Karner blue has returned to many of its former haunts throughout the 3,200-acre Preserve. This insect, first studied and named by zoologist and renowned author Vladimir Nabokov in 1944, can now be found at nearly 60 sites covering more than 400 acres of the Preserve.

“The Albany Pine Bush Preserve is one of several locations in New York State supporting Karner blue butterflies. Efforts to secure habitat for the Karner blue go a long way toward achieving the goal of restoring at least three populations in Glacial Lake Albany, the expansive sandbelt that extends from Albany to Lake George”, said NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Biologist, Kathy O’Brien, who coordinates statewide Karner blue butterfly recovery.

“Releasing butterflies into newly restored habitat is an important step in getting this iconic species off state and federal endangered species lists”, says the Commission’s Conservation Director, Neil Gifford. Gifford added, “The captive rearing program is funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service New York Field office. We are incredibly grateful for that support and for the work of the New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game, who raise the butterflies for us at their facility in Concord, New Hampshire.”

“The Service is proud to be a partner in this successful collaboration. The APBPC is one of the leaders in Karner blue butterfly conservation and recovery, and their efforts can serve as an example for other recovery areas in New York and across the range of the species” said Robyn Niver, endangered species biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

“We should celebrate the conservation success embodied in the Preserve’s work to restore the Pine Bush in general, and the Karner blue butterfly in particular,” said Patty Riexinger, Director of the Division of Fish, Wildlife and Marine Resources for DEC. “This is such a clear and motivating example of how we can contribute towards the restoration of imperiled species with direct, meaningful, and goal-oriented on-the-ground conservation work. This effort is certainly inspirational to all of us working in the conservation community.”

According to Gifford, “Twenty one adult female Karners were captured in the Preserve in June and transported to New Hampshire, where the eggs they produce were raised to chrysalises that were returned to the Commission last week. The resulting adults emerge at the Discovery Center and are released daily into the Preserve’s restored habitat”. In many cases these “new” colonies represent the return of this animal to the very locations where it was once abundant. According to Gifford, “we have returned Karners to 21 locations across the Preserve since 2008 and they all continue to support self-sufficient populations”. Gifford closed saying “We anticipate that this is the final year of our Accelerated Colonization program. With over >14,000 adult Kbb at >20 sites, in every section of the Preserve, we expect that natural colonization will be suitable to maintain/expand our metapopulation as we continue to restore additional habitat.”

“The work to restore habitat and recover the Albany Pine Bush Karner blue butterfly population has also improved habitat for dozens of other wildlife species listed as Species of Greatest Conservation Need in the New York State Wildlife Action Plan, including the red-headed woodpecker, prairie warbler and eastern hognose snake”, according to Joe Racette, State Wildlife Action Plan Coordinator for DEC.

The 3,200 – acre Albany Pine Bush Preserve (APBP), located in New York’s Capital District, protects one of the best remaining inland pitch-pine scrub oak barrens in the world. This extraordinary fire-dependent habitat provides homes for many plants and animals and contains 55 New York State-designated wildlife Species of Greatest Conservation Need, including the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly. The Preserve is a National Natural Landmark, a New York State Unique Area, Bird Conservation Area and a National Audubon Society Important Bird Area. Characterized by rolling sand dunes and miles of trails, the Preserve offers visitors many recreational opportunities including hiking, bird watching, cross-country skiing, horseback riding, mountain biking, hunting, fishing and canoeing. The Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission is a public-private partnership created by the NYS Legislature in 1988 to protect and manage the APBP and provide the public with educational and recreational opportunities.

As the gateway to the Pine Bush, the Discovery Center is a state-of-the-art “green” certified interpretive center where visitors come to understand why the Pine Bush is rare and special. A visit to this unique destination is an exciting exploration where learning comes naturally through interactive exhibits, an outdoor Discovery Trail, and numerous programs on the ecology, natural history, cultural history and management of the Pine Bush. Admission to the Discovery Center is free (there is a small fee for programs). The Center is open daily weekdays 9am-4pm, weekends and most holidays 10am-4pm. For more information, visit www.AlbanyPineBush.org or call 518-456-0655.
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LF 2015 Post Cardv2

CLICK HERE FOR THE FULL PROGRAM SCHEDULE

ALBANY NY – The Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission will host its ninth Lupine Fest on Saturday, May 16, 2015 from 11:00AM to 5:00PM at the Discovery Center. The event celebrates Pine Bush neighbors and the Capital Region’s globally rare, nationally significant, and locally distinct Albany Pine Bush. The annual spring festival honors the beautiful lupine wildflower and its importance to the conservation of several endangered butterflies. The Commission will highlight what a unique and special place it is through a fun day of music, games, crafts, snacks and more.

Christopher Hawver, Executive Director of the Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission said, “The Albany Pine Bush is a National Natural Landmark and the best remaining example of an inland pitch pine – scrub oak pine barrens in the world. The Preserve’s 3,200 acres are also a unique part of a neighborhood we share with nearly 1 million people in the Capital District. We manage the Preserve to restore and protect its plants and animals and provide our neighbors with opportunities to enjoy nature. It’s important to celebrate how it helps to bring people closer to nature and why it’s worthy of protection.”

“The block party will offer visitors a chance to connect with us and enjoy many different activities,” said Erin Kinal, Education Program Director. “The day will feature something for all ages, including a fun day of music with The Whippersnappers and a free concert by The Refrigerators, games, crafts, face painting, a make your own tie-dye party, live local wildlife programs, nature walks, food and much more!” Guests can also meet many of the Preserve’s friends and partners like representatives from LLBean’s Outdoor Discovery School, Whole Foods, the Albany Mounted Police, the City of Albany Fire Department, the Guilderland YMCA and others.

According to Hawver, “rain or shine – Lupine Fest: A Pine Bush Block Party will offer fantastic family fun for everyone.” The festival will be held at the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center at 195 New Karner Road in Albany. Like Albany Pine Bush on Facebook or visit AlbanyPineBush.org and click on Events Calendar for the full program schedule and more details. Parking for Lupine Fest is just across the street at Apollo Drive with shuttle rides to and from the parking area. Follow the PARKING signs. On-site handicap parking available.

IMG_0956 Lupine K Breisch

Wild Blue Lupine

The 3,200 – acre Albany Pine Bush Preserve (APBP), located in New York’s Capital District, protects one of the best remaining inland pitch-pine scrub oak barrens in the world. This extraordinary fire-dependent habitat provides homes for many plants and animals including 55 New York State-designated wildlife Species of Greatest Conservation Need, and the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly. The Preserve is a National Natural Landmark, a New York State Unique Area, Bird Conservation Area and a National Audubon Society Important Bird Area. Characterized by rolling sand dunes and miles of trails, the Preserve offers visitors many recreational opportunities including hiking, bird watching, cross-country skiing, horseback riding, mountain biking, hunting, fishing and canoeing. The Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission is a public-private partnership created by the NYS Legislature in 1988 to protect and manage the APBP and provide the public with educational and recreational opportunities.

As the gateway to the Pine Bush, the Discovery Center is a state-of-the-art “green” certified interpretive center where visitors come to understand why the Pine Bush is rare and special. A visit to this unique destination is an exciting exploration where learning comes naturally through interactive exhibits, an outdoor Discovery Trail, and numerous programs on the ecology, natural history, cultural history and management of the Pine Bush. Admission to the Discovery Center is free (there is a small fee for programs). The Center is open daily weekdays 9am-4pm, weekends and most holidays 10am-4pm. For more information, visit www.AlbanyPineBush.org or call 518-456-0655.

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What’s the buzz?
Insect Research in the Preserve!

The globally rare pitch pine scrub oak barrens in the Albany Pine Bush are famous for its unique and rich insect diversity. Entomologist M. Sam Adams will be working for the Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission this summer to study Pine Bush beetle and bee communities. Using plastic cups buried in the sand, we will investigate how ground beetles recover and recolonize recently burned sites. To sample bees, we will be employing malaise traps. These traps look like camping tents but are designed to catch flying insects, which once in the tent, fly up to the top where they are collected. The study will compare the present day bee community in pitch pine scrub oak barrens with samples collected over 20 years ago by NYS Museum Entomologist Dr. Timothy McCabe. We are eager to see what we will find and excited to share it with you! If you come across one of traps this summer, please leave it to do its work and help us to learn more about this locally unique wildlife habitat.

Pit Fall Trap

 

 

 

Malaise

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALBANY, NY – The globally rare, nationally significant and locally distinct Albany Pine Bush Preserve provides the ideal setting to celebrate Earth Day. With an array of activities and programs, children, families, neighbors and volunteers can enjoy all that the 3,200-acre Preserve and its state-of-the-art “green building” interpretive center have to offer.

The activities begin on Tuesday, April 14 at the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center with the Friends Annual Meeting and Woodcock Walk at 6:00pm. The FRIENDS of the Pine Bush Community Inc. invite you to attend their 2015 Annual Membership Meeting and Potluck Dinner, followed by the program: The Wild and Wacky Woodcock, led by Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission staff.

On Thursday, April 16 at 7:00pm, the Discovery Center’s Environmental Educators will offer a program called Monarch Butterflies: An Endangered Migration. The Pine Bush provides habitat for more butterfly species than any place in New York State. Ernest Williams, professor of biology at Hamilton College and butterfly ecologist for more than 30 years, discusses the long-term decline of North America’s much beloved monarch butterfly and describes conservation initiatives aimed at reversing the downward trend.

On Saturday, April 18th volunteers are invited to gather at 9:00am at the Discovery Center to work on a variety of conservation projects suitable for all ages including: trails work, pulling invasive honeysuckle, tree planting, and trash clean-up. All equipment will be provided. Please dress appropriately for the weather and outside working conditions and bring drinking water. Projects will end at noon and lunch will be provided for all volunteers.

Programs on April 14, 16 and 18 are free. Pre-registration is required for all programs. The Discovery Center is located at 195 New Karner Road in Albany. To sign up for any of these programs, please visit www.AlbanyPineBush.org and click on “Events Calendar” at the top of the page or call 518-456-0655.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE PINE BUSH:

The 3,200 – acre Albany Pine Bush Preserve (APBP), located in New York’s Capital District, protects one of the best remaining inland pitch-pine scrub oak barrens in the world.  This extraordinary fire-dependent habitat provides homes for many plants and animals and contains 55 New York State-designated wildlife Species of Greatest Conservation Need, including the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly. The Preserve is a National Natural Landmark, a New York State Unique Area, Bird Conservation Area and a National Audubon Society Important Bird Area.  Characterized by rolling sand dunes and miles of trails, the Preserve offers visitors many recreational opportunities including hiking, bird watching, cross-country skiing, horseback riding, mountain biking, hunting, fishing and canoeing. The Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission is a public-private partnership created by the NYS Legislature in 1988 to protect and manage the APBP and provide the public with educational and recreational opportunities.

As the gateway to the Pine Bush, the Discovery Center is a state-of-the-art “green” certified interpretive center where visitors come to understand why the Pine Bush is rare and special.   A visit to this unique destination is an exciting exploration where learning comes naturally through interactive exhibits, an outdoor Discovery Trail, and numerous programs on the ecology, natural history, cultural history and management of the Pine Bush.  Admission to the Discovery Center is free (there is a small fee for programs).  The Center is open daily weekdays 9am-4pm, weekends and most holidays 10am-4pm.  For more information, visit www.AlbanyPineBush.org or call 518-456-0655.

 

ALBANY NY – The Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission will be offering programs every day at the Discovery Center for the week of February 16th – 20th. “If you’re looking to get out of the house during school vacation week, come check out one of our exceptional programs,” said Sara Poggi Environmental Educator and Public Program Coordinator. “The theme for the week is “Environmental Leaders.” We have programs scheduled for all ages with both indoor and outdoor options if you want to get some fresh air” she added.

“Each program includes a unique opportunity to learn about the globally rare, nationally significant, and locally distinct Albany Pine Bush while drawing upon inspiration from environmental leaders of the past,” said Education Program Director Erin Kinal. Programs include Wonder Walk on Tuesday inspired by writer, scientist and ecologist Rachel Carson and Animal Behavior Study on Friday inspired by Nobel Prize laureate and animal behaviorist Niko Tinbergen. “Whether it’s your first time visiting us or your one hundredth, our new mid-February programs offer a great chance to come to the Discovery Center and learn something new about the Pine Bush.” continued Kinal.

Programs are $3 per person/$5 per family (children under 5 years free). Pre-registration is required for all programs. The Discovery Center is located at 195 New Karner Road in Albany. To sign up for any of these programs, please visit www.AlbanyPineBush.org and click on “Events Calendar” at the top of the page or call 518-456-0655.

The 3,200 – acre Albany Pine Bush Preserve (APBP), located in New York’s Capital District, protects one of the best remaining inland pitch-pine scrub oak barrens in the world. This extraordinary fire-dependent habitat provides homes for many plants and animals and contains 55 New York State-designated wildlife Species of Greatest Conservation Need, including the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly. The Preserve is a National Natural Landmark, a New York State Unique Area, Bird Conservation Area and a National Audubon Society Important Bird Area. Characterized by rolling sand dunes and miles of trails, the Preserve offers visitors many recreational opportunities including hiking, bird watching, cross-country skiing, horseback riding, mountain biking, hunting, fishing and canoeing. The Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission is a public-private partnership created by the NYS Legislature in 1988 to protect and manage the APBP and provide the public with educational and recreational opportunities.

As the gateway to the Pine Bush, the Discovery Center is a state-of-the-art “green” certified interpretive center where visitors come to understand why the Pine Bush is rare and special. A visit to this unique destination is an exciting exploration where learning comes naturally through interactive exhibits, an outdoor Discovery Trail, and numerous programs on the ecology, natural history, cultural history and management of the Pine Bush. Admission to the Discovery Center is free (there is a small fee for programs). The Center is open daily weekdays 9am-4pm, weekends and most holidays 10am-4pm. For more information, visit www.AlbanyPineBush.org or call 518-456-0655.

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Feb
04
2015

An Unlikely Pair

APB Deer Fisher2The Commission’s wildlife camera trapping resumed this winter and we are already getting some interesting results! So far, our data suggest that the Albany Pine Bush Preserve supports a variety of generalist mammals that can be found throughout the Preserve in both restored barrens and forests. Even fisher, a species once thought to be restricted to large tracts of northern forests, venture into restored pitch-pine scrub-oak barrens. This January, we were lucky enough to capture a picture of two animals that share habitat in the Pine Bush but are rarely seen together. A white-tailed deer was foraging in front of a camera when a fisher walked by. The fisher seemed to take no notice of the deer but the deer seemed intrigued by the fisher. The two parted ways without incident giving us a rare glimpse of an interaction between these two species.

Wendy @ 12:17 pm

ABN Community Mark-FinalALBANY NY – The Albany Pine Bush Preserve, via the not-for-profit Friends of the Pine Bush Community, will receive support from the “Community Giving Day” at Whole Foods Market Albany on January 15, 2015. To thank shoppers for their support that day, representatives from the Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission (APBPC) and the Friends group will host an Albany Pine Bush information display at the Colonie Center Whole Foods Market store from 11am – 7pm. The store will dedicate 5% of sales that day to the Friends in support of their programs to protect the Albany Pine Bush and educate under-served students.

“The Friends of the Pine Bush Community has been a fantastic partner for Whole Foods Market Albany. With a core value of supporting our local community, Whole Foods Market is ecstatic to support their efforts to help conserve and educate the community about the Albany Pine Bush Preserve” said Keri O’Brien, Whole Foods Market Albany.

Christopher Hawver, the APBPC’s Executive Director said, “This is an easy way for the community to support the important work we’re doing here in managing and protecting this globally-rare National Natural Landmark. We’re grateful to Whole Foods Market and encourage all those who care about the Preserve, nature, wildlife, open space, scientific research, land protection and education to support the Friends of the Pine Bush simply by shopping that day.”

Robin Cabanos, President of the Friends group added, “The Friends of the Pine Bush Community appreciates the support of Whole Foods Market and its customers, and is pleased to be the recipient of this community giving day. The proceeds donated will be used to increase the number of schools and students we can serve through our Ticket to Ride program.”

Whole Foods Market team members are part of the local community and they are passionate about supporting the local causes that are important to their shoppers and neighbors. Several times a year, their stores hold Community Giving Days (otherwise known as “5% Days”) where five percent of that day’s net sales are donated to a local nonprofit or educational organization.

The Friends’ Ticket to Ride program that the Community Giving Day will help fund fulfills two of Whole Foods Market’s major interests: environmental preservation and education. For many children the only thing standing in the way of a trip into the natural world of the globally-rare Albany Pine Bush is the cost of a school bus trip. The average cost per child for a school bus trip to the Pine Bush is only $5. To date the Friends have helped more than 2,362 children through their Ticket To Ride program that grants qualifying schools transportation funding to bring students to the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center and Preserve.

Hawver continued, “Bringing under-served students to the state-of-the-art Discovery Center and the Preserve is an important part of our mission. We’re not only giving kids in need a potentially-life changing experience, but we’re helping to build a broader base of future supporters.”

The Friends group currently receives many more requests than it can satisfy and have a goal of increasing their resources so they can accommodate the growing need. More information will be available at the display on the January 15th Community Giving Day, or call the APBPC at 518-456-0655 or visit AlbanyPineBush.org.

The 3,200 – acre Albany Pine Bush Preserve (APBP), located in New York’s Capital District, protects one of the best remaining inland pitch-pine scrub oak barrens in the world. This extraordinary fire-dependent habitat provides homes for many plants and animals and contains 55 New York State-designated wildlife Species of Greatest Conservation Need, including the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly. The Preserve is a National Natural Landmark, a New York State Unique Area, Bird Conservation Area and a National Audubon Society Important Bird Area. Characterized by rolling sand dunes and miles of trails, the Preserve offers visitors many recreational opportunities including hiking, bird watching, cross-country skiing, horseback riding, mountain biking, hunting, fishing and canoeing. The Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission is a public-private partnership created by the NYS Legislature in 1988 to protect and manage the APBP and provide the public with educational and recreational opportunities.

As the gateway to the Pine Bush, the Discovery Center is a state-of-the-art “green” certified interpretive center where visitors come to understand why the Pine Bush is rare and special. A visit to this unique destination is an exciting exploration where learning comes naturally through interactive exhibits, an outdoor Discovery Trail, and numerous programs on the ecology, natural history, cultural history and management of the Pine Bush. Admission to the Discovery Center is free (there is a small fee for programs). The Center is open daily weekdays 9am-4pm, weekends and most holidays 10am-4pm. For more information, visit www.AlbanyPineBush.org or call 518-456-0655.
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APB Lupine Fest 2013 by Krishna Hill (13a)ALBANY NY – To honor men and women in uniform, past and present, the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center will host two Live Local Wildlife programs on Veteran’s Day, Tuesday November 11, 2014. The first program at 1:00pm is for veterans or active military, their guests and the public, and the second program at 3:00pm is for veterans, active military and their guests only.

Christopher Hawver, Executive Director of the Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission said, “In using the Discovery Center as a community resource, it’s our privilege to be able to honor, in our own unique way, those that serve or have served with these special programs.”

The Discovery Center will host Beth Bidwell of Wild Things Environmental Education who will introduce program participants to some of the animals that call this area home. She offers a rare opportunity for her audience to come face to face with reptiles, raptors and other live birds.

According to Jeffrey Folmer, Discovery Center Director, “Our resourceful staff of Environmental Educators are always looking for creative ways to engage with visitors of all ages, and from that came the idea to do something a little different for Veteran’s Day. The globally-rare Pine Bush is a special place where we invite our neighbors to learn fascinating facts about their wild neighbors!”

All ages are welcome and both programs are free of charge, however pre-registration is required. The event will be held rain or shine at the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center at 195 New Karner Road, Albany. For more details and to pre-register, visit AlbanyPineBush.org and click on Events Calendar or call 518-456-0655.

The 3,200 – acre Albany Pine Bush Preserve (APBP), located in New York’s Capital District, protects one of the best remaining inland pitch-pine scrub oak barrens in the world. This extraordinary fire-dependent habitat provides homes for many plants and animals and contains 55 New York State-designated wildlife Species of Greatest Conservation Need, including the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly. The Preserve is a National Natural Landmark, a New York State Unique Area, Bird Conservation Area and a National Audubon Society Important Bird Area. Characterized by rolling sand dunes and miles of trails, the Preserve offers visitors many recreational opportunities including hiking, bird watching, cross-country skiing, horseback riding, mountain biking, hunting, fishing and canoeing. The Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission is a public-private partnership created by the NYS Legislature in 1988 to protect and manage the APBP and provide the public with educational and recreational opportunities.

As the gateway to the Pine Bush, the Discovery Center is a state-of-the-art “green” certified interpretive center where visitors come to understand why the Pine Bush is rare and special. A visit to this unique destination is an exciting exploration where learning comes naturally through interactive exhibits, an outdoor Discovery Trail, and numerous programs on the ecology, natural history, cultural history and management of the Pine Bush. Admission to the Discovery Center is free (there is a small fee for programs). The Center is open daily weekdays 9am-4pm, weekends and most holidays 10am-4pm. For more information, visit www.AlbanyPineBush.org or call 518-456-0655.
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Exhibit Opening
Pine Bush Perspectives: Photo Exhibit
ALBANY NY – On November 2, 2014 from 1-4pm the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center will host the unveiling of their first juried photo exhibit, celebrating the uniqueness and diversity of the Albany Pine Bush Preserve.

Education Program Assistant Blake Etchison who is heading up this new project said, “Each visitor views the Albany Pine Bush Preserve from a unique vantage point worthy of celebrating and sharing. The jurors, Denise Hacker-Stoner and Scott Stoner, selected a wonderful group of photographs representing the biological diversity of the Preserve as well as the diversity in age and focus of the photographers. Each of the photographs in the show gives us a unique perspective of this inland pine barrens.”

The exhibit will be open until January 1, 2015 and is being sponsored by Friends of the Pine Bush Community. Friends’ president Robin Cabanos said, “The Friends are pleased to celebrate and recognize all of the photographers who captured so many unique perspectives on the Albany Pine Bush. We hope the images exhibited will inspire others to go afield with their camera and experience something new.” Juror selected awards will be presented during the opening and light snacks will be provided.

All ages are welcome. The event will be held rain or shine at the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center at 195 New Karner Road, Albany. For more details, visit AlbanyPineBush.org and click on Events Calendar or call 518-456-0655.

The 3,200 – acre Albany Pine Bush Preserve (APBP), located in New York’s Capital District, protects one of the best remaining inland pitch-pine scrub oak barrens in the world. This extraordinary fire-dependent habitat provides homes for many plants and animals and contains 55 New York State-designated wildlife Species of Greatest Conservation Need, including the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly. The Preserve is a National Natural Landmark, a New York State Unique Area, Bird Conservation Area and a National Audubon Society Important Bird Area. Characterized by rolling sand dunes and miles of trails, the Preserve offers visitors many recreational opportunities including hiking, bird watching, cross-country skiing, horseback riding, mountain biking, hunting, fishing and canoeing. The Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission is a public-private partnership created by the NYS Legislature in 1988 to protect and manage the APBP and provide the public with educational and recreational opportunities.

As the gateway to the Pine Bush, the Discovery Center is a state-of-the-art “green” certified interpretive center where visitors come to understand why the Pine Bush is rare and special. A visit to this unique destination is an exciting exploration where learning comes naturally through interactive exhibits, an outdoor Discovery Trail, and numerous programs on the ecology, natural history, cultural history and management of the Pine Bush. Admission to the Discovery Center is free (there is a small fee for programs). The Center is open daily weekdays 9am-4pm, weekends and most holidays 10am-4pm. For more information, visit www.AlbanyPineBush.org or call 518-456-0655.

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