Latest News

We Need Help from ... 9/25/17

We are looking for neighbors that live within half a mile of the preserve to help track changing weather patterns by measuring the depth of snow in their own backyard.

Endangered Karner ... 7/20/17

Twenty-five years after being federally listed as endangered, the APB population of the Karner blue butterfly has exceeded recovery goals for the local population.

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Conservation Science

Research, inventory and monitoring programs are essential to assessing the status of species and ecological communities as well as measuring the progress of management actions towards achieving the Commission’s goals and objectives. Monitoring rare communities and species is intended to document changes in distribution and abundance over time and/or as a result of management activities. For instance, Karner blue butterfly numbers have been monitored, according to specified protocols, to determine changes in numbers from year to year and to identify changes in the locations of sub-populations. Inventory efforts represent searches for species and natural communities and to provide documentation on their distribution. Most community inventory work in the Albany Pine Bush has been completed, though some rare species, historically identified in the Pine Bush, are still being sought. Research involves specific studies to expand our understanding of the biology of organisms and ecological processes that maintain communities and habitat. A variety of research projects have been undertaken at the Albany Pine Bush.

Implementing research in the Preserve requires a Temporary Revocable Permit from the Commission. Please request an application if you’re interested in conducting research in the Preserve.

To date, much has been learned about the Albany Pine Bush. Yet, there are still gaps in our understanding of the ecology, natural, and cultural history of Albany’s inland pitch pine — scrub oak barrens. Research is an invaluable tool to help us find answers to an ever-growing list of questions about the Pine Bush, how it came to be and how it functions today.

Current Research:

At any given time there may be multiple research, monitoring and inventory projects occurring in the Preserve. Government agencies and institutions, college and university students and faculty, individuals, and grade school students all conduct research in the Preserve.

Current research, inventory and monitoring projects in the Pine Bush Preserve:

Fisher research in the Pine Bush.

  • Ecological and behavioral adaptations in urban fisher (Martes pennanti) (New York State Museum)
  • Ecology of Pine Barrens Vernal Ponds and other Pine Bush wetlands (Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission)
  • Distribution and abundance of the endangered Karner blue butterfly (Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission)
  • Albany Pine Bush habitat restoration reduces the risk of Lyme disease: a cost-benefit analysis with a novel approach (Union College)
  • Reproduction and survivorship of Prairie Warbler (Dendroica discolor) in the Albany Pine Bush Preserve (Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission)
  • Distribution and abundance of solitary bees and wasps in managed inland pitch pine scrub oak barrens (Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission)
  • Use of pitch pine scrub oak barrens by birds during spring and fall migration (Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission)
  • Habitat Management for Conservation of Inland Barrens Buck Moth in the Albany Pine Bush. (State University of New York-College of Environmental Science and Forestry, the Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission and the Biodiversity Research Institute at the New York State Museum)
  • Pitch pine seedling recruitment in managed pitch pine scrub oak barrens (Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission)
  • Eastern Hognose Snake in the Albany Pine Bush Preserve. (Private Researcher and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation — Endangered Species Unit)
  • Distribution and abundance of whip-poor-will in the Albany Pine Bush Preserve (Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission)
  • American woodcock in the Albany Pine Bush Preserve (Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission)
  • Habitat suitability for potential reintroduction of the Regal Fritillary butterfly (Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission)
  • Evaluation of survey effort for documenting the distribution and abundance of frosted elfin (Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission)